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Extra resources for American Language Course - Book of Idioms -

Sample text

To look for a needle in a haystack] to search for a small object in a large area: -+ Trying to find that report on this unorgani zed desk is like looking for a needle in a haystack. 7. [to look forward to something] to anticipate with pleasure: -+ She is really looking forward to her retirement. 8. [to look into one's crystal ball] to make a guess: -+I wish I could look into my crystal ball and see who will win the championship next month. 9. [to look out upon] to have the view of something in a specified direction: -+ Both of us have apartments which look out upon the ocean.

To look out upon] to have the view of something in a specified direction: -+ Both of us have apartments which look out upon the ocean. 10. [to look sharp] to look good: -+ The cadets all look sharp in their new uniforms. 11. [to look the other way] to ignore or pretend not to notice something that is wrong or illegal: -+ You weren't supposed to use our copier for your personal work, but we'lllook the other way this time. 36 a loose tongue - carelessly talking about private lose -1. [to lose face] to lose dignity ; to experience some disgrace or embarrassment: -+ Neither nation in the dispute wished to lose face.

To learn by heart] to memorize: -+ The children had to learn their parts in the play by heart. 3. [to learn the hard way] to learn by making a mistake: -+Jack learned the hard way that you can't cheat on a test. The school expelled him. leave - 1. [to leave a bad taste in one's mouth] to give a bad impression: -+ His attempt to cheat me left a bad taste in my mouth. 2. [to leave 34 it/something alone] to not touch or deal with something: -+ You can leave that pile of papers alone. I'll sort them tomorrow.

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American Language Course - Book of Idioms -


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